Call Us Today!
(734) 788-4630
Book Now

Marble and Granite Questions

Questions and Answers about our marble and granite countertop installation work

Marble and Granite Frequent Questions 2018-02-28T22:35:19+00:00
Because natural stone has variations, it is not a good idea to select stone too early. Coloration and veining may vary from one shipment to the next. Three to four weeks before installing your cabinets is a good time to make your final selection, based on current inventory.
Remnants are the smaller pieces of stone carried over from previous installations. If sufficient material is available, remnants can be used in any stone application.
This refers to granite that has not been polished to a shine. It retains a smooth, matte finish. Honed granite is lighter in color than its polished counterpart, and can be deepened using a color-enhancing sealer.
It depends on the granite. Availability, color, and country of origin are major factors that affect the price of granite. If the supply of a particular stone is short and the demand is high, the price will be affected. However, many granite colors are available at the same price or even less than man made products.
Whether you choose marble or granite, there is a broad spectrum of pricing. Origin, availability, and yield of a given quarry are all factors that determine the price of natural stones.
Because of the movement and veining in natural stone, an exact representation is impossible on a swatch. Stone varies from shipment to shipment, so if you have a sample from a previous batch, it may not match the current supply. We encourage our customers to select an actual slab prior to fabrication.
We recommend that you do. This will help to prevent any surprises or disappointments once the actual material is installed.
Yes, but weigh this decision carefully. Marble is susceptible to staining, scratching, and etching.
Yes. It is not uncommon to mix colors and types of stone within a room. When mixing stones, consider which material would be the most practical for each space. For example, when mixing granite with marble, the granite would be best suited for the area around the range because it is the most durable. The marble could be used on the island or as a dining table.
Any polished surface is slippery when wet. Always exercise caution when exiting the shower and tub, and on other wet areas.
Bacteria, like any other living organism, needs food to live. Granite is not edible and performs second only to stainless steel in ability to resist bacterial growth. Just remember to keep your granite countertops clean.
While planning your kitchen, keep granite slab sizes in mind. On average, granite slabs are approx 110 inches x 66 inches. Though in some colors, 120-inch slabs are not unusual. The color selection in unusually large slabs is limited, so an especially large work surface may require a seam.
This is a matter of personal preference. If installed properly, both types of sinks are sanitary and safe. The aesthetic appeal and ability to wipe crumbs directly into the sink make under-mounted sinks popular. Though, they generally incur a small additional fee due to the finishing process of the edges around the sink.
Yes it is. However severe settling, excessive impact, and abuse, is usually the culprit. Happily, a specialist can repair most minor cracks and chipping in granite.
Cast stone is composed of finely ground stone mixed with resins or cement-based products. This is poured into a mold to produce either a slab or to create sinks, mantels, etc. Natural stone, however, is hewn from the earth, then cut and polished to retain the original, natural form.
This refers to granite with a satin, textured finish. During the processing phase, the more typical polishing bricks are replaced with abrasive brushes to produce this unique finish.
Not necessarily. Some veins are strictly color variations. However in some materials, natural flaws can exist within the vein, enhancing the color of the stone. With today’s processing, these materials still meet the structural requirements for countertop use.
Mesh backing gives stone the sufficient stability required for shipping, fabrication, and installation.
No. Textured granites are created when the original slabs are flamed and brushed, creating a low sheen with an evenly textured finish. Although enhanced, the stone retains its superior durability over alternative countertop surfaces.
It is best to use a cleaning product made specifically for natural stone. Depending on your stone, we can recommend the ideal product.
It is best to use a cleaning product made specifically for natural stone. Depending on your stone, we can recommend the ideal product.
Granite porosities vary. If not properly sealed, some granite can absorb liquid into the pores. This may initially appear as a stain. However in many instances, a dark area on the countertop will dry and disappear over time. If discoloration occurs, there are products available to remove them.
The polish on any natural stone closes the structure, making it less porous. Still, it is best to seal all natural stone upon installation.
Many people recommend an annual resealing of your stone. However, some types of granite are harder than others and may never require resealing. If you notice water absorption into the countertop or darker areas around the sink, it is time to reseal.
A color enhancer is used to enrich stone’s natural color. The color that a stone becomes when wet is a good indication of the color it will be once enhanced. Enhancers may need to be re-applied periodically and should be tested in a small area or on a sample piece of the stone prior to application.
Yes, most color enhancing sealers retain the same properties of other sealers.
Yes, marble countertops can be refinished through a process of grinding and re-polishing. The process will vary depending on the damage or wear. This project will require a professional refinisher.
Yes, granite is found in many states including Georgia, North Carolina, Maine, the Dakotas, California and New York.